A few amusing questions …

 … from a sur­vey that I under­took at a doctor’s office.  Much of the sur­vey just bog­gles the mind … not to men­tion the fact that one would think the researchers, includ­ing my own doc­tor, would already know the answers to sev­er­al of the ques­tions, at least as they apply to them­selves and their own patients.

First I’d like to men­tion what I’m sure has a research pur­pose (although I ques­tion the valid­i­ty of it) which is, actu­al­ly, some­thing that I con­sid­er to be more about what we are recent­ly hear­ing referred to as virtue sig­nalling:  In this case, ask­ing me, after hav­ing treat­ed me as a patient for some­thing like 12 years, if I “iden­ti­fy” as male, female, trans­gen­der, trans­sex­u­al, non-bina­ry, gen­derqueer or oth­er.  Yes, they asked that!  Now I wish I had said “oth­er” — par­tic­u­lar­ly if I could have then filled in a word or phrase of my choice, and tell them that I iden­ti­fy as an attack heli­copter (heli­sex­u­al).

 

 

Sample Survey Questions:

My doc­tor calls me at home to see how I am doing?
Strongly Disagree — Disagree — Unsure — Agree — Strongly Agree

My doc­tor con­sid­ers my eth­nic and cul­tur­al back­ground when for­mu­lat­ing a care plan for me?
Strongly Disagree — Disagree — Unsure — Agree — Strongly Agree

My doc­tor takes the time to dis­cuss with me my pref­er­ences and health care options when mak­ing a treat­ment plan?
Strongly Disagree — Disagree — Unsure — Agree — Strongly Agree

 

If you think you have a long wait to see a doc­tor now, just wait until the doc­tor is required to start phon­ing you at home to see how you are doing, or to dis­cuss “health care choic­es” with you:  Your choice is that you take this pre­scrip­tion and get bet­ter or piss off and suf­fer!  Some will argue that there may be var­i­ous pre­scrip­tion options and the doc­tor should dis­cuss those with you — Again, let’s see how many weeks or months it takes you to get an appoint­ment when the doc­tor now has to sit there and give patients a basic edu­ca­tion in phar­ma­col­o­gy, biol­o­gy, chem­istry, and sta­tis­tics (among pos­si­ble oth­ers) and how they all inter­play and are inter­re­lat­ed in med­ical case, and how and why he has come to the con­clu­sion that THIS pre­scrip­tion is the best choice for you giv­en your con­di­tion.  You have an infec­tion:  Do you know what anaer­o­bic and aer­o­bic bac­te­ria are, and which ones are which?  Do you know what gram-neg­a­tive and gram-pos­i­tive bac­te­ria are, and which ones are which?  Do you know whether it is more or less like­ly that the infec­tion you have is caused by an anaer­o­bic gram-neg­a­tive species of X bac­te­ria with­out wait­ing 2 or 3 days for it to be cul­tured?  Because you need treat­ment now, and you might not still be alive in 2 or 3 days.

We don’t pay doc­tors (and you/we DO pay them — either direct­ly, or through insur­ance pre­mi­ums, or through tax­es) to obtain 8+ years of sci­ence and med­ical edu­ca­tion and train­ing to sit there and address our feel­ings about choic­es.

That’s what doc­tors are edu­cat­ed and trained to do, and it’s part of what they are paid the big bucks for:  To use all of their knowl­edge and train­ing to make the best choic­es and deci­sions for each indi­vid­ual patient, as rapid­ly and effec­tive­ly as pos­si­ble.  When I have an aer­o­bic gram-pos­i­tive species of X bac­te­ria caus­ing an infec­tion, just how does my eth­nic and cul­tur­al back­ground come into play in the deci­sion mak­ing process or my health care “choic­es?”  Is pre­scrip­tion A most­ly used by white peo­ple and it is big­ot­ed and “cul­tur­al­ly insen­si­tive” to not have offered me pre­scrip­tion B instead, because B is what is more com­mon­ly pre­scribed in my cul­ture?  Ridiculous!

The “patient choice” and “patient first” and “health care options” con­cepts are a fias­co and a fal­la­cy as they are inter­pret­ed and prac­ticed by the pro­gres­sive left that now dom­i­nate Canadian fed­er­al and provin­cial pol­i­tics, Ministries of Health, hos­pi­tals and oth­er health care ser­vices.  We don’t pay doc­tors (and we DO pay them — either direct­ly, or through insur­ance pre­mi­ums, or through tax­es) to obtain 8+ years of sci­ence and med­ical edu­ca­tion and train­ing to sit there and address our “feel­ings” about “choic­es.”

Yes, there are occa­sions where patients should be giv­en a choice and, in those cas­es, it is rea­son­able and required that doc­tors dis­cuss those choic­es with the patient in an appro­pri­ate man­ner:  An exam­ple would be your choice, in cer­tain cir­cum­stances, to have surgery soon­er than lat­er, or to decline cer­tain treat­ments if you so desire.  However, it bog­gles the mind that tax­pay­ers’ mon­ey is spent to ask, among oth­er things, whether the doc­tor calls me at home to see how I am doing … when they already know the answer (or ought to) … It just leaves me ques­tion­ing whether per­haps the health care sys­tem, in fact, has more mon­ey than brains it knows what to do with, espe­cial­ly when in one room I’m being asked, again at tax­pay­ers’ expense, whether I iden­ti­fy as “gen­derqueer,” and in anoth­er room a meet­ing is under­way to lay off more nurs­es, close beds, and cut ser­vices because of a (sup­posed) lack of mon­ey.

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